Alison Uttley Society - Guestbook





Comments:
I loved her books as a youngster.They were so refreshing.Sam Pig was such a nice character and did such fun things such as going on a train,once he was rold it wasn't a dragon! He had some wonderful adventures.
I also lked 'Cuckoo Cherry tree' and the story of 'The Grandfather Clock'stands outEvidently She believed in life after death!
The story or 'Wee Willie Winkie' in 10 Candlelight Tales was another delightful read.
All bring back a flavour of a simpler lifewhen we managed withoutthe gadgetry of today.


Added: February 17, 2017
Delete this entry Reply to entry View IP address




Comments:
Fond memories of Little Grey Rabbit from my Buckinghamshire childhood in the late 1950s.

Added: January 15, 2017
Delete this entry Reply to entry View IP address




Comments:
very nice site i enjoy coming here

Added: November 26, 2016
Delete this entry Reply to entry View IP address



Comments:
I have fond memories of sitting cross legged on the grass in Greta Hall garden in Keswick, listening to Alison read to us one Sunday afternoon in around 1960. Magical.

Added: August 29, 2016
Delete this entry Reply to entry View IP address




Comments:
Brought up with her books, especially Sam Pig. In adult years I have come to treasure Country Child and her other 'country' books.
Glad to have found your website. Fabulous!


Added: July 15, 2016
Delete this entry Reply to entry View IP address




Comments:
I am so happy to see on this lovely web site, that The Country Child is being republished in the summer of 2016! I have an old battered copy of it, and it's my favourite book of all time. I treasure every chapter and every now and again re-read a portion as a treat. I want to choose it for the book club I am in, but can't expect members to be paying a lot of money for a copy; hence so pleased it's being republished. I have a whole collection of books by Alison Uttley, and a couple that she has signed. I treasure them all.

Added: December 31, 2015
Delete this entry Reply to entry View IP address




Comments:
Skimming through Amazon UK Books just now, in search of rare work-related material, I was side-tracked by a pop-up ad. for A.U.'s "Stories for Christmas"; I have my old copy, but was enchanted by 2 or 3 readers' reviews : do read them !

Wed. 4th November 2015


Added: November 4, 2015
Delete this entry Reply to entry View IP address




Comments:
It's a very long time since we posted anything but we have been busy: our great conservation stone masons and roofers have been making the finishing touches to the beautifully rebuilt kitchen chimney and have been carrying on with re-doing soakers on the roof and repointing (in lime, of course) the rear elevation. The window frame to Alison's window in her attic summer bedroom is sadly pretty rotten and I think we are looking at replacement on a like for like basis rather than repair. Exciting for me is the prospect of carpet in my bedroom, after almost 4 years of living here. More early post med pottery found and redecorating the attic bedroom. We have also made cider from the apples in the orchard! Busy, busy, busy. Louise

Added: October 16, 2014
Delete this entry Reply to entry View IP address



Comments:
Hello again Sheila.

I must say I agree with the Beaconsfield teacher; it seems to me that instead of pouring forth exquisite invention, Blyton merely exploited a box of tricks to conscript the child reader into supplying the exquisite invention themself. Perhaps I am an old curmudgeon but I have found only a few really fine writers for children. Uttley obviously, and Arthur Ransome comes to mind. But Blyton, Crompton, Potter and many others I find a disappointment in the end.

You will be pleased to hear that Uttley is well alive here in Australia - I have received a deluge of emails. I thought that titled as you are "Uttley Trustee" you might like to have some of what they send me.

Scholard is a word all right, and it has always been rare.

Admin reply: All fascinating. The word could well have been considered old Derbyshire by Alison. She also uses many vernacular or out of use words in her adult essays on country life.


Added: June 9, 2015
Delete this entry Reply to entry View IP address



Comments:
The word "scholard"

I have been reading Alison Uttley since the 1940s. I thought then, and I still think now, that she is without peer in her genre. Congratulations and thanks for this spendid website.

The purpose of this note is to ask if you know any Uttley scholards who might throw some light on the word "scholard". I have encountered this word only twice: Uttley 1938 when Hedgehog relates: "He told me once I was a quadruped, and I said No! I'm a plain hedgehog. Plain I am and plain I'll be, but my Fuzzypeg, he's a scholard." - and James Joyce 1939 in Finnegan's Wake, where is occurs once ("Trinity Scholard"). Does anyone know? is it dialect? Humorous? And did Joyce read Uttley?

thanks
John

Admin reply: Thanks for your interesting inquiry. I am no J.Joyce scholar but this is what I think about scholard in Uttley.

Firstly, she loved to play around with words, some invented, to amuse and stretch children. The implication from the father hedgehog is that he himself is a simple creature, a dullard, whereas Fuzzypeg is the brains of the family, a scholar(d). Sometimes she means children to pick up that there is something wrong/different about a word. I recently had a message from a lady who said that at her school in Beaconsfield, where AU lived for many years, they were not allowed to read Blyton but encouraged to read Uttley. I know the BBC in the 1930's felt the same. Maybe J.Joyce was playing round with the same antithesis of dullard/scholard.
Let me know if you find more on this. I am pleased you find our website interesting. Alison was here 1903-6 (hons Physics) and left us royalties for bursaries.

Best wishes,

Sheila Griffiths. Archivist Ashburne Hall, University of Manchester Uttley Trustee


Added: June 7, 2015
Delete this entry Reply to entry View IP address
Powered by PHP Guestbook - brought to you by PHP Scripts
 
1 2 3 4 5 6 Next › Last »